About


Our  mission is to encourage a conversation about topics ranging from traditional fine arts to post-modern modes of art to the serendipity and aesthetics that are encountered in daily living.   

 

       The Bowdoin Art Society, a student-run organization at Bowdoin College, has a threefold purpose: 1) to promote the vibrancy of the arts at Bowdoin, accomplished largely through the annual "340 Miles North" art show, 2) to foster the arts community at Bowdoin, accomplished by weekly meetings discussing art, and 3) to expand the notions of what art is and can be, contributing to developments in the international art scene, accomplished by the creation of site-specific installations and by the publication of the Bowdoin Journal of Art.  

 

 

What we do:

  • “340 Miles North” and “The Spring Show.”  Two curated art exhibitions of over 60 artists featuring interactive installations, performance artists, video, sound, painting, and other media.
  • The Bowdoin Journal of Art. The only American collegiate journal of art history.  Undergraduate students from throughout the country submit work which is rigorously reviewed.
  • Art Battle Benefit Party.  Four artists compete on stage to create the best painting while the party roars below.  
  • Discussions and luncheons with artists, curators, gallerists, and directors. 

  • Art Education. Meeting with art classes to help present their work.

 

Once a week, we meet to discuss current happenings in the art world, both on and off campus. We think together about what art is and what it can be.  Here are some conversation topics from different meetings:

- Is the structure of an art curriculum inherently "traditional" by forcing students to take classes in painting and drawing before they can take classes that explore other media?

- In London, a student  lost his virginity on stage.  Another nailed his private parts to the ground.  What is the influence of the body in art and does it correspond to trends in the art market?

- A large component of the art world, especially at art fairs, is partying.   Does this change the meaning of the art?